Week 12: At the end? already?

It’s been a hectic week trying to get a copious amount of assignments done, but we’ve managed to find time to finish off our documentary. We’re all at my house today polishing of a few interviews and rearranging our home page. Surprisingly there isn’t much to get done. The interviews are pretty much edited. We just need to cut them down to a shorter time because at the moment, Emily’s and Mark’s interviews are running at 10 minutes, my aim is to cut it down to 3-4 mins so they’re easier to upload and watch. It shouldn’t take that long to edit as I’ve already edited the bulk of it so it’s just a means of making them look pretty. I thought they would be heaps to get done today, but it looks like we can easily get this finished by Friday!  Phew!

Week 11: All set

There’s not much going on with my vegetables this week, but on Thursday I’ll be transplanting my carrot seedlings into my garden bed. I’ll probably make a short blog post about them once I get them planted in.

So unfortunately I couldn’t make it to our last interview and food swap, but I made up in work by updating some things in our dropbox. I’ve also made sure to have everything ready to edit our videos. On Monday I got my brother to set up his old gaming computer for me and installed all of the adobe programs needed on it. Now all there’s left to do is get the footage and edit!

 

Week 10!

Wow! It’s already week 10 so that means we have 2 more weeks to get this all done. I’ve filmed a bit more of my garden on my end of things, but I have yet to still get it edited and uploaded on to youtube. I’ve also taken pictures of my carrots and will upload them to the dropbox after I’ve transplanted in my garden bed, all ready for the flickr slide show. I guess all there is now is to get cracking on with the last of our interviews and strenuous hours of editing footage, exciting!

So it’s been about a week and a bit since I’ve harvested my radishes and I haven’t really touched them since. The other day I had a tuna sandwich and thought it would be a good idea to put some in it. 

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Success! it was pretty yummy indeed! Anyways, need to find a recipe to use the rest of them in soon, hopefully they’ll last a for a bit longer.

Week 9

Things are coming along pretty well at this stage of our project. We’ve started to go out and about to obtain the information we need to make up our documentary. Last Friday we interviewed Emily Swanson, a lady from Geelong who organizes food swaps in her community. Her garden was absolutely lovely and it was interesting to actually get to know someone who was passionate about self-sustainability. Besides a few technical difficulties with the lapel microphone,  a bit of wind and unwanted background noises, the interview was really good. We had wrote up a bunch of questions, but I noticed that it was just easier to ask questions from the top of our heads. In saying this, I find this style of interviewing creates a more natural and comfortable feel to our documentary. I’m excited to see what next to come!

So on a different note, everything that we’ve planted in the first weeks of our process of our projects are really starting to take shape. I’ve just harvested a bunch of my radishes which i had planted in the third week back to uni. On top of that my herbs are well and truly alive, my coriander plant is huge! Haven’t been cooking with them just yet, but every time I’m in the garden I pick at it (lol).

Week 8:

In the past couple weeks our project has been gaining a bit of momentum and everything is beginning to come together. We’ve started to get tweets up onto our twitter and started filming a few things here and there. Danny filmed a short video about a little update of his heirloom tomato seedlings. I’ve edited a draft of it to show how we want the finished product to look like. You can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-E9Pp2ne-DM

Now on to my garden! What I’ve learned about doing this project is the satisfying feeling you get when you grow your own vegetables. At first I was a bit scared of growing my own produce, simply because I thought everything was going to die on me. I feel like a bit of a fool now that I think of it, but it is super easy!! So five weeks ago I planted in some radishes in my garden bed and I think they’re just about ready to harvest.

 

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As you can see they’re nice and red and round. Just looking at it bring a huge smile on my face, I cannot wait to pluck these babies out! So on another note, I am having a bit of trouble with my herbs. They are growing perfectly fine, but something is eating at my basil.

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I don’t want to put any pesticides on it and I’m fine with a few bugs eating at it. I’m just hoping it won’t get worse. And here is my mint, they’re looking a bit dull but I’ve just taken all of the dead leaves off.

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Week 7: Seeing Improvement

So it’s been two weeks since I’ve transplanted my herbs into my garden bed and since then I’ve seen good results. First of all my coriander has been looking much more healthier than they were in the milk cartons.

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And my basil has definitely been growing like a dream. (please ignore my finger on the right)

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My other vegetables are looking pretty good as well, but I’ve seen the most change within these herbs. On another note, my mixed coloured carrots have germinated as well. Here are two photo’s to show how much they’ve grown in the last 2-3 weeks.

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Week 6: Yet another update

Hey guys! It’s been a quite uneventful week up on my end of things, so I really don’t have much to blog about today. I’m just gonna update you my vegie garden. So I’ve decided to discard my recyclable pots because my herbs look like they’ve been craving for more space. My basil and rosemary which I planted in the soda bottles grew pretty well and I’m surprised with how well they’ve been surviving. Here’s a picture of the basil, oh my, it makes me so happy to see it’s actually grown. Look at the roots on the bottom of the bottle!

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If you’re wondering what’s growing along the bottom of the photo, they’re radishes which I got about two weeks ago. I had completely forgotten I had bought them for a week before I had planted them in. I thought I had lost them for sure because the leaves were all limp, but surely enough, once I got them in the patch they popped back to life. Phew. If you look at the photo below, I’m growing string beans along the bottom as well. My dad bought them, but had no space in his patch so he gave them to me. Oh and bad news, my tomato plant sort of died (from over watering it). I’ve given it to my dad to see if he can bring it back to life.

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Anyways, so this is my vegie patch at the moment. The gap in the middle is for my carrots once the seeds germinate and are ready to plant. My coriander (right from the basil) didn’t really like being in the milk cartons, as you can see below. All of it’s leaves turned purple-orange colour, but hopefully they’ll turn back to green after planting it in the garden bed. I have still yet to re-plant my mint, but I need to find a pot so it can spread out a bit.
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Week 5: My Dad’s Vegie Patch

I still have yet to plant my vegetables in my raised garden bed I bought last week as I have been awaiting the mixed coloured carrot seeds to come in.  So I thought, since I can’t update you on my vegie patch I can tell you about my dads! As you can see down below, my dad has made this shade structure out of stakes and some sort of mesh cloth. He’s really passionate about giving his vegetables the best environment to grow in since the last two years most of our vege didn’t seem to survive that well. This shade just helps prevent frost on cold days and burning on warmer days.

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So in the above photo, he’s also made a trellis for his beans and  bought some stakes to help with the growth of his tomatoes. The reason I’m showing you guys this is to show how easy it is to obtain information about how to help your plants grow. Everything that my dad has made is from idea’s that he’s gotten from the internet. Perhaps more and more people are becoming more self-sustainable is because we have such easy access to websites like Google and YouTube? Just a thought. 

Anyways, I was looking at everything that’s growing in my garden the other day and I just realized I have a huge curry leaf plant and a kaffir lime tree growing. I haven’t taken photos of them, but here’s how the leaves look like.

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Curry Leaves.

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Kaffir Lime Leaves.

These leaves are mainly used in Asian cooking. As you can guess, curry leaves are used in curries, while kaffir lime leaves are used in Thai and Malaysian dishes such as tom-yum and rendang. As we’re attending the ‘Harvest Swap’ in Geelong, I was thinking I could bring some of these babies along to swap.

Week 4: An Update

On Saturday I went out and bought a garden bed from Aldi for $40 (bargain!!). Here it is below.
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I went out early to get it and the rate that they were selling at really surprised me. They were selling like hotcakes! So many people were there to buy them that it was difficult to push through crowd to grab one. People were buying more than one, which was interesting to see. Perhaps they were buying more to give as gifts, or maybe even buying more for themselves so they could have more space to plant their vegies. Either way, it was nice to see that people were getting enthusiastic about getting hold of these garden beds. It just goes to show that growing your own produce is beginning to be a popular thing. I just wish I had a camera with me or thought of the idea of interviewing these people for our documentary.

Anyways, since we’ve all agreed to buy some seeds from: http://greenharvest.com.au/SeedOrganic/OrganicSeedIndex.html, I was thinking getting of carrots to start growing in my vegie patch. To be honest, I’m a little scared of growing them from scratch because I fear that it may not grow. So I’m just gonna play it safe and just get the carrot seeds.

Here’s a little update on my herbs in recyclable objects:

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I’ve got rosemary, basil, thyme, mint, coriander and tomatoes growing in the big can.

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(Close up macro-shot of mint. Macro shots make everything look cooler haha)

I’ve decided to water them once I week since I don’t want to drown them. I think in the future I might move the herbs into bigger containers so they have more room to grow.